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”Once More into the Grey” - a collaboration between SABOT & UNA Galleria, soon in Piacenza

Added on by Alex Mirutziu.

UNA Galleria

Once More into the Grey”

Opening: October 27, 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Exhibition: October 27 - December 29, 2018

Opening Hours: Tue - Fri 4 pm - 7 pm | Sat 10 am - 1 pm and 4 pm - 7 pm + by appointment

via Sant'Antonino 33, Piacenza, Italy

Photo credit: Marco Fava

UNA is pleased to announce its collaboration with SABOT gallery from Cluj-Napoca and to present ”Once More into the Grey”, a group exhibition which includes artworks by Răzvan Botiș, Radu Comșa, Camilia Filipov, Nona Inescu, Alex Mirutziu, Vlad Nancă.

The exhibition, specially conceived by Sabot for the space of UNA, features a selection of black and white artworks only by Romanian artists - an allusion to the state of the (art) world today and, at the same time, to the famous Cluj "grey school of painting”. Nonetheless, not only paintings are on display, the exhibition is conceived as a colorless dialogue between several rather mysterious works – sculpture, photography, installation.

SABOT gallery has been founded by Daria D. Pervain and Marcel Janco at the beginning of 2009 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, as an attempt to verify the raison d'être of a gallery in the third millennium. Hidden relationships, longtime friendships, communality, fictional identities and situations blurring the barrier between public and domestic — these are the main, statutory highlights of SABOT. A laboratory, an incubator, a research tentacle, the gallery acts equally as a curator, a producer, and a habitat. Since its debut, SABOT has co-founded two art centers in Cluj-Napoca - The Paintbrush Factory, in 2009, and Centrul de Interes, at the beginning of 2017 - hugely contributing to the development of the Romanian contemporary art scene. Until 2018, the gallery has participated in more than 30 international art fairs – from Artissima or ARCOmadrid, to LISTE, Paris Internationale and NADA Miami, to name just a few.

In Pictures: 'Around the Truth is the Truth' solo show by Alex Mirutziu at Kunstverein Ost - KVOST Berlin

Added on by Alex Mirutziu.

Around the Truth is the Truth

6 September - 15 December, 2018

Kunstverein Ost

Leipziger Str. 47 / Entry Jerusalemer Str., Berlin

***

Photos by Alex Mirutziu

Alex Mirutziu & TAH 29, soon at KVOST Berlin

Added on by Alex Mirutziu.
Alex Mirutziu / Opportunistic mise en scene #16 / 2016 / Mixed media on photograph / 20,3 cm x 30,5 cm       Romanian artist  Alex Mirutziu  explores the fringes of what can be seen or represented. His lightly rendered strokes, referred to as “homeless lines” by the artist, approach the portrayed objects without ever keenly contouring them.  This intended vagueness, leaving room for inconclusiveness, misunderstandings or the indefinable, is also palpable in the artists’ installations and performances. Mirutziu's work surveys the periphery of things and inquires the possibilities of intervention into a fixed order.  Like many artists of his generation growing up in the former eastern bloc, Mirutziu names the wishfully observed culture of the west as an important reference point to his practice. Yet his escape route from the limitations of a post totalitarian Romania wasn’t shaped by the pop cultural iconography that we often see imprinted in contemporary visual aesthetics, but rather radical poetic and philosophical ideas.  Mirutziu's interventions, inscribing bodies, overpainting photographs or installing objects resembling rearview mirrors, often feel crude, direct and brutal. They expose the relationship between concrete reality and subjective actuality as deceptive and constructed. Truth, as reflected in the title of this solo exhibition, is not understood as a moral or absolute category but as an empty center within a complex system of ascriptions, presumptions and fictionalizations.  In his piece „The urgency of the idea of closure in drawing“ Mirutziu will perform alongside his younger self, symbolized by a graphite mask, on the opening night. „The project The Artist as Himself at 29“ (TAH 29) focusses on the instability of self-narrations and the inevitable distortion of past events.  Text by Diana Weis / 2018  ***  Alex Mirutziu was born 1981 in Sibiu (RO) and lives in Cluj-Napoca (RO). Mirutziu has been lecturing in performance and theatre focused institutions from Royal Academy of Arts, London, to Von Kraal Theatre, Estonia, Konstfack, Stockholm, and collaborated with various artists, among which Grit Hachmeister (DE), Paul Devens (NL), Elias Merino (ES), Graham Foust (US), Graham Harman (US). His most recent projects have been hosted by IASPIS, Stockholm; ZDB, Lisbon; Power Plant, Toronto; The Glass Factory Lab, Boda; Mucsarnok Kusthalle, Budapest; the Center for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, and the National Museum, Warsaw.

Alex Mirutziu / Opportunistic mise en scene #16 / 2016 / Mixed media on photograph / 20,3 cm x 30,5 cm

 

Romanian artist Alex Mirutziu explores the fringes of what can be seen or represented. His lightly rendered strokes, referred to as “homeless lines” by the artist, approach the portrayed objects without ever keenly contouring them.

This intended vagueness, leaving room for inconclusiveness, misunderstandings or the indefinable, is also palpable in the artists’ installations and performances. Mirutziu's work surveys the periphery of things and inquires the possibilities of intervention into a fixed order.

Like many artists of his generation growing up in the former eastern bloc, Mirutziu names the wishfully observed culture of the west as an important reference point to his practice. Yet his escape route from the limitations of a post totalitarian Romania wasn’t shaped by the pop cultural iconography that we often see imprinted in contemporary visual aesthetics, but rather radical poetic and philosophical ideas.

Mirutziu's interventions, inscribing bodies, overpainting photographs or installing objects resembling rearview mirrors, often feel crude, direct and brutal. They expose the relationship between concrete reality and subjective actuality as deceptive and constructed. Truth, as reflected in the title of this solo exhibition, is not understood as a moral or absolute category but as an empty center within a complex system of ascriptions, presumptions and fictionalizations.

In his piece „The urgency of the idea of closure in drawing“ Mirutziu will perform alongside his younger self, symbolized by a graphite mask, on the opening night. „The project The Artist as Himself at 29“ (TAH 29) focusses on the instability of self-narrations and the inevitable distortion of past events.

Text by Diana Weis / 2018

***

Alex Mirutziu was born 1981 in Sibiu (RO) and lives in Cluj-Napoca (RO). Mirutziu has been lecturing in performance and theatre focused institutions from Royal Academy of Arts, London, to Von Kraal Theatre, Estonia, Konstfack, Stockholm, and collaborated with various artists, among which Grit Hachmeister (DE), Paul Devens (NL), Elias Merino (ES), Graham Foust (US), Graham Harman (US). His most recent projects have been hosted by IASPIS, Stockholm; ZDB, Lisbon; Power Plant, Toronto; The Glass Factory Lab, Boda; Mucsarnok Kusthalle, Budapest; the Center for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, and the National Museum, Warsaw.

Around the Truth is the Truth

6 September - 15 December, 2018

Opening: 5 September 2018, 7pm

Performance: 8pm

Kunstverein Ost

Leipziger Str. 47 / Entry Jerusalemer Str., Berlin

KEDEM-KODEM-KADIMA at CCA Tel Aviv

Added on by Alex Mirutziu.

KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA

March 30 – May 26, 2018

Opening reception on March 29, 8 pm

Monica Bonvicini in conversation with Sergio Edelsztein on March 29, 7 pm

The Center for Contemporary Art Tel Aviv

Tsadok HaCohen 2, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

Born from Rock,  Collection II , 2015, Michael Topyol

Born from Rock, Collection II, 2015, Michael Topyol

The Center for Contemporary Art Tel Aviv is pleased to announce its next exhibition KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA which includes contributions by Diti Almog, Arahmaiani, Yochai Avrahami, Ilit Azoulay, Guy Ben-Ner, Monica Bonvicini, Born from Rock, Rafram Chaddad, Latifa Echakhch, Ceal Floyer, Shilpa Gupta, Peter Halley, Michal Helfman, Chourouk Hriech, Gaston Zvi Ickowicz, Eti Jacobi, Christian Jankowski, Kitty Kraus, Jannis Kounellis, Agnieszka Kurant, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Benoît Maire, Alex Mirutziu & TAH29, Jonathan Monk, Laurent Montaron, Natan Tarfe, Joshua Neustein, Adrian Paci, Eli Petel, Pratchaya Phinthong, Wilfredo Prieto, Public Movement, Tomer Rosenthal, Miri Segal, Ariel Schlesinger, Shiri Tarko, Jan Tichy, Naama Tsabar, Alice Tomaselli, Lihi Turjeman, Günther Uecker, Johannes VanDerBeek, Lawrence Weiner, and Nevet Yitzhak.

Presented at the CCA together with three additional spaces in Tel Aviv—Born from Rock’s workshop, Idris, and The Lobby – Art Space—“KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA” is the first exhibition curated by the CCA’s new director, Nicola Trezzi. Among the many ideas connected to this project, six of them deserve to be mentioned in this context. The first one is the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the CCA Tel Aviv, which was initiated in 1998 by Sergio Edelsztein, who directed it until 2017 and who will stay on as Chairman of the Board. Mirroring this pivotal moment in the history of the institution, “KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA” will include works by artists whose work has been exhibited at the CCA in the past—such as Arahmaiani, Ceal Floyer, Michal Helfman, Christian Jankowski, Agnieszka Kurant, and Adrian Paci—and works by artists who will present projects in the future—such as Ilit Azoulay, Laurent Montaron, Naaba Tsabar, and Nevet Yitzhak.

The second idea is connected to the title of the exhibition. Hebrew is a fascinating language based on roots; from one root you can “build” multiple words, sometimes different if not in contradiction with each other. This is the case of the root kuf(ק), dalet (ד), mem (מ), from which you can build kedem [ancient], kodem [before], and kadima [forward]. Following this concept, many works will be created, or recreated, especially for the exhibition, and some of them will eventually disappear or be destroyed. Following this attitude, the exhibition is dedicated to Jannis Kounellis (1936-2017), whose last exhibition was conceived and presented in Israel.

The third idea connected to this exhibition is the choice of a specific display. On the ground floor and balcony of the CCA, and also in the three additional spaces, works have been juxtaposed in accordance to disparate associations. Concepts, notions, and figures as diverse as “human condition,” “site-specific,” “Passover,” and “fire and water” have been employed to bring works of art together. Inspired by the “Radiant Face of Moses” (Exodus 34:29-35), on the first floor gallery of the CCA, the space will be kept dark and all the works presented there will generate their own light in the form of video projections, light bulbs, light boxes, and more.

The forth idea is the decision to include an exhibition-within-the-exhibition called “Department of Rocks and Stones.” Rocks and stones both symbolize construction and destruction. They also appear in seminal passages of the New Testament, from Jesus’s provocation “Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her” (John 8:1-10) to his verbal testament “And I tell you that you are Peter, [The Greek word for Peter means rock] and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it” (Matthew 16:13-20). Scattered within the exhibition, the “Department of Rocks and Stones” includes works by Jannis Kounellis, Michal Helfman, Joshua Neustein, Shilpa Gupta, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Jonathan Monk among others.

The fifth idea is connected to the choice of extending the exhibition to the three aforementioned spaces—going against territoriality and instead embracing collegiality and inclusivity. Following these premises “KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA” goes beyond its own premises—the Rachel & Israel Pollak Gallery—scattered in different areas of the city. Like its logo, the Center for Contemporary Art Tel Aviv will function as a “black sun” with several satellites (spaces), emphasizing elliptical trajectories (elliptical time versus linear time) and its related concept of “eccentricity.”

The sixth and last idea is a public program that will start before the exhibition opens and will continue throughout its duration. The program includes a conversation between Pratchaya Phinthong and Nicola Trezzi on March 20, a conversation between Monica Bonvicini and Sergio Edelsztein on the opening day on March 29, an artist talk by Chourouk Hriech on April 2, a roundtable with Drorit Gur-Arie, Doron Rabina, and Nicola Trezzi, moderated by Hila Cohen-Schneiderman on May 9, and a conversation between Christian Jankowski and Sergio Edelsztein on May 17. In addition to this program, on April 13 and 14 Public Movement will perform their action The Interview.

The “KEDEM–KODEM–KADIMA” is made possible with the support of the Ruth Ivor Foundation, Dana Sheves, Daniel Milman, Ari Rosenblatt, Yehoshuah Gessel & Yoel Kremin, Yifat Gurion and Fresh Paint, Outset Contemporary Art Fund, Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Tel Aviv, Institut Français, Tel Aviv, and the Fondation Jacqueline de Romilly under the auspices of the Fondation de France, Artport, Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, São Paulo / Rio de Janeiro, Inga Gallery, Tel Aviv, Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York, and Sommer Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv.

The Center for Contemporary Art is supported by the Ministry of Culture and Sport – Visual Arts Department; Tel Aviv Municipality – Culture and Arts Division; UIA – the United Israel Appeal; the CCA’s International Council, which welcomes its new members Luca Barbeni, Manon Slome, and Susanna Perini; the Zucker Foundation Fund; and those who wish to remain anonymous.

Info from: cca.org.il

DOUBLE HEADS MATCHES at New Budapest Gallery

Added on by Alex Mirutziu.

NEW BUDAPEST GALLERY

1093 Budapest, Fővám tér 11–12., (Bálna Budapest)

February 16 – 27 May 2018

Artists:

DRAGOȘ ALEXANDRESCU | APPARATUS 22 | ION BÂRLĂDEANU | IOANA BĂTRÂNU | MARIUS BERCEA | ȘTEFAN BERTALAN | DAN BEUDEAN | RUDOLF BONE | GETA BRĂTESCU | MICHELE BRESSAN | CORNEL BRUDAȘCU | ANDRE CADERE | MIRCEA CANTOR | ANDREI CHINTILĂ | RADU CIOCA | RADU COMȘA | ROMAN COTOȘMAN | GEORGE CRÎNGAȘU | OANA FĂRCAȘ | ADRIAN GHENIE | TEODOR GRAUR | ION GRIGORESCU | SIMON CANTEMIR HAUȘI | GHEORGHE ILEA | MI KAFCHIN | IOSIF KIRÁLY | ANA LUPAȘ | ALEX MIRUTZIU | GILI MOCANU | CIPRIAN MUREȘAN | VLAD NANCĂ | PAUL NEAGU | SORIN NEAMȚU | IOANA NEMEȘ | MIKLÓS ONUCSAN | DAN PERJOVSCHI | CRISTI POGĂCEAN | GHEORGHE RASOVSZKY | CRISTIAN RUSU | ȘERBAN SAVU | MIRCEA SUCIU | SUPERNOVA | ROMAN TOLICI | DORU TULCAN | GABRIELA VANGA

Collections:

RĂZVAN BĂNESCU | MIRCEA PINTE | PLAN B FOUNDATION | OVIDIU ȘANDOR

Curators:

DIANA MARINCU, ZSUZSANNA SZEGEDY-MASZÁK

Opening speech by:

KRISZTINA SZIPŐCS

Deputy Director of Collections and Exhibitions, Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art

Opening:

Friday, 16 February 2018, 6–8 pm

 

DOUBLE HEADS MATCHES

A selection of contemporary artworks from four Romanian private collections

The title, inspired by Mircea Cantor’s work, suggests multiple narratives which one can elaborate on Romanian art, having in mind a compressed timeline, which will be discovered either through the historical end of this line itself or through the most recent art production of the young, vivacious art scene. The exhibition, a cut-out from a yet unwritten “ring of fire” of the most impressive visual productions of recent decades, offers an opportunity to retrace conceptual links, invisible stories, common inspiration, and relevant friendships between the artists selected.

The artworks presented were selected from four important Romanian private collections of today – the collections of Mircea Pinte, Ovidiu Şandor, Răzvan Bănescu and the Plan B Foundation – found in three different cities: Cluj, Timişoara and Bucharest. The selection, compiled with the help of curator Diana Marincu, provides a comprehensive and informative cross-section of contemporary Romanian art, though it also includes examples of Romanian neo-avantgarde works, which suggest that, although every generation has its own perceptions and responses, the creators and consumers of art can forge bridges between generations. Indeed, it has been said of the so-called Cluj School that its representatives harbour a keen interest in the recent past.

The collections boast emblematic works by renowned Romanian artists such as Mircea Cantor, Adrian Ghenie, Ciprian Mureşan, Vlad Nancă, Ioana Nemeș, Şerban Savu and Mircea Suciu, who rose to international fame as their patrons’ collections were coming into being. At the same time, the collectors’ interest in the young generation of artists, for instance Mi Kafchin, Alex Mirutziu and George Crîngașu, extends the focus to a variety of mediums and subjects.

While there are many overlaps among these collections, each assembly of artworks has its own distinctive character and geographical focus, and each reflects a unique type of interest. This exhibition strives to offer insights into the personal tastes of these passionate collectors, for whom art collection, as Răzvan Bănescu so aptly remarked in an interview, is not merely a hobby, but a life model. Their patronage has been instrumental in the integration of contemporary Romanian art into public spaces and the international art scene. The exhibition can be a platform to initiate meaningful comparisons between private art collecting in Hungary and Romania: the 2014 exhibition Contemporaries: Collectors and Artists, which presented works from 38 Hungarian collections, was also organized by the Budapest Gallery.

Info from: www.budapestgaleria.hu